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Pōmare II
King of Tahiti

Pōmare II

Pōmare II
The basics

Quick Facts

Intro King of Tahiti
Was Monarch King
From France French Polynesia
Field Military Royals
Gender male
Birth 1782, Tahiti, France
Death 7 December 1821, Moorea, France (aged 39 years)
Family
Father: Pōmare I
Spouse: Teriitaria II
Children: Pōmare IIIPōmare IV
The details (from wikipedia)

Biography

Pōmare II (c. 1782 – December 7, 1821) (fully Tu Tunuieaiteatua Pōmare II or in modern orthography Tū Tū-nui-ʻēʻa-i-te-atua Pōmare II; historically misspelled as Tu Tunuiea'aite-a-tua), was the second king of Tahiti between 1782 and 1821. He was installed by his father Pōmare I at Tarahoi, February 13, 1791. He ruled under regency from 1782 to 1803.

Life

Initially recognised as supreme sovereign and Ariʻi-maro-ʻura by the ruler of Huahine, he was subsequently forced from Tahit and took refuge in Moʻorea December 22, 1808, but returned and defeated his enemies at the Battle of Te Feipī, November 11, 1815. He was thereafter recognised as undisputed king (Te Ariʻi-nui-o-Tahiti) of Tahiti, Moʻorea and its dependencies.

On November 15, 1815, he proclaimed himself King of Tahiti and Moʻorea in the name of the Christian God.

Conversion to Christianity

Pomare II believed that he lost favor with the god 'Oro, and, aided by the missionary Henry Nott, he began paying more attention to the God of the Christians.

He was baptised May 16, 1819 at the Royal Chapel, Papeʻete – Christianity and the support of English missionaries aided the centralisation of monarchic power.

Three London Missionary Society missionaries, Henry Bicknell, William Henry, and Charles Wilson preached at the baptism of King Pōmare II. Afterwards, "Henry Bicknell stood on the steps of the pulpit, took water from a basin held by William Henry, and poured it" on King Pōmare's head.

Pōmare II extended his realm to land outside of the Society Islands. He inherited his father's dominion over the Tuamotus and settled many conflicts between the disparate local chieftains in 1817 and 1821. However, his family's rule only extended to the eastern and central portions of the Tuamotus archipelago. In 1819, the king took nominal possession of Raivavae and Tubuai in the Austral Islands, although control was relegated to the local chiefs.

Today a majority of 54% of the French Polynesian population belongs to various Protestant churches, especially the Maohi Protestant Church which is the largest and accounts for more than 50% of the population. It traces its origins to Pomare II, the king of Tahiti, who converted from traditional beliefs to the Reformed tradition brought to the islands by the London Missionary Society.

Family

Pōmare II was married first before March 1797 (betrothed January 1792) to his double first cousin Tetua-nui Taro-vahine, Ariʻi of Vaiari (now Papeari), who died at ʻArue, July 21, 1806. Around 1809, he married two sisters: Teriʻitoʻoterai Teremoemoe and Teriʻitariʻa who were daughters of Tamatoa III, Ariʻi Rahi of Raiatea.

With his second wife Teriʻitoʻoterai Teremoemoe, he had three children:

  • ʻAimata (28 February 1813 – 17 September 1877), who ruled as Pōmare IV
  • Teinaiti (21 November 1817 – 20 March 1818), who died young
  • Teriʻitariʻa (25 June 1820 – 8 January 1827 (age), who ruled as Pōmare III

Death

Pōmare died of alcohol-related causes at Motu Uta, Papeete, Tahiti on December 7, 1821.

He was succeeded by his son Pōmare III, who reigned 1821–1827.

Ancestry

16. Teuruari’i
16. Teuruari’i
8. Tu-moe-hania
17. Marurai
4. Teu Tunuieaite Atua
18. Vehi-atua-i-te-mata’i
9. Tetua-huria
2. Pōmare I
20. Teri’i-ve-tearai Rofa’i
10. Tamatoa III
21. Marama
5. Tetupaia-i-Hauiri
11. Mai-he’a
1. Pōmare II
12. Teri’i-Vaetua-i-Ahura’i
6. Teihotu-i-Ahura’i
26. Tu-nui-e-a’e-i-te Atua Tutaha
13. Airoro-ana’a-i-Farepu’a
27. Te-ra’i-atua
3. Tetua-nui-reia-i-te-raʻi-atea
14. Punua Teraitua-i-Nu’urua
7. Vave’a Tetua-nui-rei-a-ite Ra’iatea
30. Pu-nua-i-te-atua
15. Fetefete-te-ui
31. Te-varua-nei-atua
16. Teuruari’i
8. Tu-moe-hania
17. Marurai
4. Teu Tunuieaite Atua
18. Vehi-atua-i-te-mata’i
9. Tetua-huria
2. Pōmare I
20. Teri’i-ve-tearai Rofa’i
10. Tamatoa III
21. Marama
5. Tetupaia-i-Hauiri
11. Mai-he’a
1. Pōmare II
12. Teri’i-Vaetua-i-Ahura’i
6. Teihotu-i-Ahura’i
26. Tu-nui-e-a’e-i-te Atua Tutaha
13. Airoro-ana’a-i-Farepu’a
27. Te-ra’i-atua
3. Tetua-nui-reia-i-te-raʻi-atea
14. Punua Teraitua-i-Nu’urua
7. Vave’a Tetua-nui-rei-a-ite Ra’iatea
30. Pu-nua-i-te-atua
15. Fetefete-te-ui
31. Te-varua-nei-atua
8. Tu-moe-hania
17. Marurai
4. Teu Tunuieaite Atua
18. Vehi-atua-i-te-mata’i
9. Tetua-huria
2. Pōmare I
20. Teri’i-ve-tearai Rofa’i
10. Tamatoa III
21. Marama
5. Tetupaia-i-Hauiri
11. Mai-he’a
1. Pōmare II
12. Teri’i-Vaetua-i-Ahura’i
6. Teihotu-i-Ahura’i
26. Tu-nui-e-a’e-i-te Atua Tutaha
13. Airoro-ana’a-i-Farepu’a
27. Te-ra’i-atua
3. Tetua-nui-reia-i-te-raʻi-atea
14. Punua Teraitua-i-Nu’urua
7. Vave’a Tetua-nui-rei-a-ite Ra’iatea
30. Pu-nua-i-te-atua
15. Fetefete-te-ui
31. Te-varua-nei-atua
The contents of this page are sourced from Wikipedia article on 08 Apr 2020. The contents are available under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
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