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Alice K. Bache

Alice K. Bache

American art collector
Alice K. Bache
The basics

Quick Facts

Intro American art collector
A.K.A. Alice Odenheimer Kay Bache, Alice Odenheimer
Was Art collector
From United States of America
Type Arts
Gender female
Birth 1903
Death 1977 (aged 74 years)
Residence New York City, USA
Family
Children: Paul KayEllen Stephen Kay
Peoplepill ID alice-k-bache
The details

Biography

Alice K. Bache (1903-1977) was a philanthropist and art collector of mostly ancient art including Cycladic, Pre-Columbian, Mexican, Asian and Peruvian works of art. She amassed one of the finest and most extensive private collections of pre-Columbian artifacts, which she began gifting to the Metropolitan Museum of art in 1967.

Early life

Mrs. Bache was born Alice Odenheimer, daughter of Pauline Freyan and Lane Cotton Mills textile scion Sigmund Odenheimer in New Orleans. She graduated from Tulane University, then earned a master's degree in philosophy at Columbia University. Her children from her first marriage to William de Young Kay were Paul Kay, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University, of California, Berkeley, and Ellen Kay. In 1954 Alice Odenheimer married brokerage firm head Harold Bache.

Philanthropy

Alice K. Bache was active in the affairs of the Johnson Art Museum at Cornell University and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, and served as director of the Japan Society, president of the New York Section of the National Council of Jewish Women and Mayor's Advisory Board.

The contents of this page are sourced from Wikipedia article on 22 Feb 2020. The contents are available under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
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References
https://www.metmuseum.org/blogs/now-at-the-met/2015/a-jewelry-designers-tour
https://www.nytimes.com/1977/03/09/archives/alice-bache-74-a-bankers-widow-and-art-collector.html
//www.worldcat.org/issn/0362-4331
https://allthingslinguistic.com/post/152784454077/why-red-means-red-in-almost-every-language-issue
http://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1954/09/06/84133249.html
//edwardbetts.com/find_link?q=Alice_K._Bache
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