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Abraham E. Lefcourt

Abraham E. Lefcourt

American real estate developer
Abraham E. Lefcourt
The basics

Quick Facts

Intro American real estate developer
Was Businessperson Real estate developer
From United States of America
Type Business
Gender male
Birth 1877, Birmingham, Birmingham, West Midlands, United Kingdom
Death 13 November 1932 (aged 55 years)
Peoplepill ID abraham-e-lefcourt
The details (from wikipedia)

Biography

Abraham E. Lefcourt (March 27, 1876 – November 13, 1932), better known as A.E. Lefcourt, was a prominent real estate developer in New York City in the 1920s. In his lifetime Lefcourt was known as one of the most prolific developers of Art Deco buildings in New York City. Describing Lefcourt in a 1930 newspaper article, The New York Times said, "No other individual or building organization has constructed in its own behalf as many buildings as are in the Lefcourt Group."

Early life

Lefcourt was born Abraham Elias Lefkowitz on March 27, 1876, to Russian-Jewish immigrants in Birmingham, England. His family immigrated to New York's Lower East Side in 1882 where Lefcourt grew up in a predominantly Jewish and poor community.

Career

Lefcourt began his career as a newsboy and bootblack. He became a prominent figure in the New York garment industry when he assumed control of his employer's wholesale business. His forays into real-estate began in 1910 with a 12-story loft on West 25th Street. He built many more structures in the area, including the Alan E. Lefcourt building at 49th Street, known today as the Brill Building, heralding the beginnings of the new Garment Center.

An entrepreneur, Lefcourt had numerous other business interests, including founding Lefcourt Normandie National Bank, which eventually became a part of JP Morgan Chase.

Notwithstanding his success and a net worth reported to have been as much as $100 million in 1928, Lefcourt's empire began to unravel during the Depression, with his company going into foreclosure and his buildings being auctioned off. In 1932, with creditors pursuing him and others accusing him of fraud, Lefcourt suffered a heart attack in his Savoy-Plaza Hotel apartment and died at the age of 55.

Personal life

He married Irma Viola Castleberg (1883–1949). The couple began using the surname Lefcourt around 1900 but did not officially adopt the name until 1909. The Lefcourts had two children: Mildred Audrey, born in 1908, and Alan Elias, born in 1913. Lefcourt constructed the Brill Building in part as a memorial to his son Alan Elias who died of anemia in February 1930. Lefcourt himself died on November 13, 1932, at the Savoy Hotel, leaving an estate of only $2,500. Services were held at Temple Emanu-El in Manhattan. Mrs. Lefcourt died in 1949 at Nantucket, MA; she was at the time of her death listed as a resident of the Savoy-Plaza Hotel.

Buildings

Among Lefcourt's more notable real estate development projects:

  • Brill Building, 1619 Broadway, New York, NY
  • Lefcourt Newark Building/Raymond Commerce Building, 1172-1182 Raymond Boulevard, Newark, NJ Now known as Eleven-Eighty.
  • Lefcourt Clothing Center, 275 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY
  • Lefcourt Colonial Building, 295 Madison Avenue, New York, NY
  • Lefcourt Empire Building, 989 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY
  • Lefcourt Madison Building, 16 East 34th Street, New York, NY
  • Lefcourt Manhattan Building, 1412 Broadway, New York, NY
  • Lefcourt National Building, 521 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY, designed by Shreve, Lamb and Harmon
  • Lefcourt Normandie Building, 1384 Broadway, New York, NY
  • Lefcourt State Building, 1375 Broadway, New York, NY

Sources

The contents of this page are sourced from Wikipedia article on 15 Feb 2021. The contents are available under the CC BY-SA 4.0 license.
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References
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:2WKC-9HR
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,744769-2,00.html
http://www.thecityreview.com/madison.html
https://select.nytimes.com/mem/archive/pdf?res=F00717FD3A5E1B728DDDA10994DD405B808FF1D3
https://select.nytimes.com/mem/archive/pdf?res=F00714FC3A55167A93C4A8178AD85F4D8285F9
http://www.scripophily.com/nybankhistoryl.htm
https://select.nytimes.com/mem/archive/pdf?res=F20E13FD355513738DDDAC0994DA415B828FF1D3
https://select.nytimes.com/mem/archive/pdf?res=FB091FFF3C5F11738DDDAF0894DA405B818FF1D3
https://select.nytimes.com/mem/archive/pdf?res=F7071EFA3A5513738DDDAF0994D9415B828FF1D3
https://books.google.com/books?id=kOQwPXh2xZIC&q=Lefcourt&pg=PA303
https://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/03/realestate/03scapes.html?_r=0
https://www.jta.org/1932/11/15/archive/lefcourt-funeral-services-here-today
http://www.brillbuilding.com/history.html
https://web.archive.org/web/20060616033004/http://www.brillbuilding.com/history.html
http://www.virtualnewarknj.com/busind/office/lefcourt.htm
https://www.nytimes.com/1989/09/10/realestate/streetscapes-readers-questions-an-italianate-co-op-and-a-second-empire-facade.html
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